Hey everyone, welcome back. Today I wanted to share my decade long blogging journey with you. Honestly, I don’t remember exactly when I started blogging but its been at least a decade.

When I first started, I used a free platform called Blogger. It was easy to use and I could build as
many blogs as I wanted. In the beginning, most of my blogs were personal journals or hobby related. I think I also had some ministry and writers blogs as well. WordPress was still fairly new and uncharted territory for me.

However; I did manage to get my feet wet with a few small health and fitness niche blogs. They were a big craze back then. I also used a micro blogging platform called Squidoo. I had really high hopes of creating lots of  blogs and squids to sell. That was also a big craze at the time. It seemed that many were making big money from building and selling them. Unfortunately it wasn’t a successful thing for me. Which left me wondering if it was really that successful for anyone.

Over time, all my blogs have faced the same fate. I would decided I wasn’t interested in them and move on to another blog. I could never seem to find my sweet spot. I think a lot of the problem in the first five years had to do with crazy life events and just being exhausted. I was taking care of an elderly mom and had a full time music ministry. Eventually I had to put my ministry on hold to take care of her 24/7. But as much as I love singing, I love my mom more. She was my best friend and whole world. After she passed in 2015, life events changed once again.

For the second half of the decade, I was uprooted and moved to a new state and a new life. I struggled to find my place and to survive. I made a few more attempts at blogging with Blogger but they also fell by the wayside. By now you’re probably saying, so how’s this any different? Won’t you loose interest the same way you have all the other times? The answer is, NO! I’ll tell you what’s different. Here’s what my blogging journey has taught me.

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First, I had the wrong mindset.
Second, I hadn’t found the right motivation.
And third, I was using a free platform.

There’s nothing wrong with that for a hobby or personal journal blog. But for a real business you need your own hosting. I couldn’t afford it back then but thankfully life changes. My passion for blogging never died, it just need to be reignited again.

So here is what I learned from all my failed attempts and even a few false starts with this blog.

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Get in the right frame of mind. Stop thinking about it as just a hobby. Get serious!
Find what you’re passionate about and have a natural talent for. If you don’t have the skills, learn them. I found I had a passion and natural talent for graphic design. But I needed to hone my skills so I practiced and learned from others in my field until I was good enough to start my business. Its never too late to learn something new.
Find a way to pay for hosting. You need to show your url not someone else’s. It’s worth it to look truly professional. If you’re not good at designing a website or branding it, then find someone who is. I know it
can be expensive but its worth it. And not all of us are in it only for the money. So you may be able to strike a deal if you have services you can trade for all or part their services.
One of the biggest things I’ve learned from the false starts on this blog, is
be prepared. Make sure you have everything ready before launching. Give yourself a few months after your site has been built to gather content. Make sure every page is complete and you have at least two weeks to a months worth of post and social media content. This will save you a lot of headaches.

Once I changed my mindset, found my passion, was able to invest in my business and took the time to get prepared, everything changed. I went from having a hobby to a real business and from being a crafter to a real entrepreneur. 

Also take  the time to arrange your work schedule. I’ve finally got mine planned and its worth taking the time to do this.  Here’s a little glimpse into my creative work week.

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Sunday and Monday I’m stuck in the house with no wifi [I’m a live in care giver.] So on these days I do a lot
of offline work [project planning, image editing, writing, brand photography, offline projects, etc.] If needed
I do have a lot of data so I can use my hotspot.
Tuesday through Saturday I leave the house at 11am need to be back by 5pm. During those hours out of the
house, I go to the library to work. During these days I do mostly online work [research, projects, social
media, image search, layout and scheduling post, etc.] The only offline work I do on Tuesday and Wednesday
is writing. Its sometimes difficult to get much of that done at the house [to many distractions]

I hope this post has encouraged some. No matter how long you’ve been trying, don’t give up. Keep trying until you find your sweet spot. I would love to hear about your experiences, leave me a comment.

Have a blessed day!


♥ Marti

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Hi I'm Marti

Welcome to my site! I’m the owner/graphic designer and lifestyle blogger behind this studio. Click here if you would like to learn more about me and my business

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